Recent News

Can the U.S. assume leadership in crafting a political solution to the Afghanistan crisis that satisfies the core interests of the major regional actors – Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Iran, and the Afghan Taliban?  

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What are the U.S.’s security commitments abroad, what are these commitments intended to achieve, and how can they be reconfigured to better advance the national interest while reducing their economic and political costs?

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In June, the Tobin Project supported a two-day symposium, “Crisis and the Challenges of Regulatory Design,” as part of the Kenan Institute for Ethics’s ongoing faculty working group on the purposes and strategies of regulatory governance. Motivated by a belief that ideas matter and that the dominant approaches to regulatory policy in the United States have significant limitations, the working group was created in 2010 with the aim of generating new conceptual frameworks to improve regulatory decision-making.

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Following the passage of the Affordable Care Act in Spring 2010 and building on two cross-disciplinary workshops held since 2009, the Behavioral and Institutional Regulation working group met in April to examine new regulatory approaches to the health-insurance market.

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The Tobin Project is pleased to announce the 2011-2012 recipients of its Democracy & Markets graduate student fellowships. With thirteen grantees in seven different disciplines, the Tobin Project’s network of aspiring scholars is growing, and the forum program is expanding to New Haven. In the fall of 2011, the Tobin Project will host monthly Graduate Student Forums in New Haven, CT for its grantees at Yale University to share their research in an interdisciplinary setting. 

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In May 2011, Robert Art (Brandeis University, Politics), Barry Posen (MIT, Political Science), William Hitchcock (University of Virginia, History), and Jeremi Suri shared their work on U.S. grand strategy with a group of diplomats, think-tank researchers, and scholars at a seminar convened by the Tobin Project and Georgetown University’s Institute for the Study of Diplomacy. Participants – including former U.S. diplomats Dr.

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In May, the authors of the Tobin Project’s Preventing Capture volume met to review, critique, and discuss their chapters prior to submitting full drafts this summer. The meeting built on the energy and ideas developed at the November 2010 author meeting, which included early-stage policymaker input, and a process of revision and consultation with the volume’s co-editors and Tobin Project staff over the winter.

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The Tobin Project is pleased to announce that it will host a forum and fellowship program for doctoral students undertaking work related to its inquiry into the "Prudent Use of Power in American National Security Strategy." This program seeks to foster rigorous, policy-relevant research on how the United States can better wield nonkinetic, or nonmilitary, power to provide U.S. and international security.

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This winter, the Tobin Project convened top scholars to explore a question on the cutting edge of public and academic debate: Did economic inequality in the United States contribute to the financial crisis?

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How can the United States best integrate its diplomatic, military, and economic power to advance its national security interests?

In December, the Tobin Project brought together academics, policymakers, and think-tank researchers from various disciplines for a three-day conference focused on pressing, unanswered questions arising out of current policy debates and ongoing research at the Tobin Project. 

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